the-green-witch

Anonymous asked:

you can make coffee magical, right? everyone seems to be a tea drinker and i am so not...

upthewitchypunx answered:

You can pretty much make anything magical. I’ve used coffee in spells as a “hurry up” ingredient. I thought I had a link to a post about a simple chant to say over your coffee to help it energize you but I can’t find it. I did find this:

I’m actually more of a coffee person than tea person as well. I actually roast my own coffee and there’s a lot to be learned from the beans and how to create a desired roast and the origins of coffee also produce different things. It’s actually more important to be able to listen to the coffee roasting than to look at it.

thecarvingwitch:

greydraconem:

lunar-lavender:

ruthlesswoodcarver:

rileythehellgoat:

constantine-spiritworker:

math-witch:

I’m working as a barista these days so coffee is always on my mind! consider the magical qualities of different brewing methods:

  • espresso: it’s highly concentrated, so you could make a pun and use it for concentration & focus. it’s brewed very quickly, so it could speed spells/events up. it’s also brewed with super-high water pressure, so it could respresent finesse/skill under pressure.
  • cold press: this type of coffee steeps for a long time, so you could use it to draw attention, to slow down events/spells, to help you mull something over, or to help someone else consider things deeply.
  • moka pot / percolator: obviously, this could help someone’s thoughts “percolate” in the figurative sense, as part of a turth-revealing spell, perhaps. moka pots work by steam, so it could invoke “letting off steam”, or using your anger for a productive purpose.
  • drip brew: the water doesn’t steep with the coffee grounds at all, just passes on through. you could use drip coffee to help someone pass you by or pay you less attention. it could be part of a spell to leave a good first impression, too! just consider the quality of the coffee you use in that case.

I just made all these up, so don’t take them as gospel truth. I believe that everything can be a magical ingredient if you consider its properties! like, consider the role of coffee socially (“want to get coffee sometime?”) as part of a spell to meet new people or connect with someone distant! or consider the flavour notes of beans from different regions, and invoke those effects. I could go on forever, ok. AND I didn’t even talk about the chemistry of coffee at all *goes off to research*

WHY HAVE I NEVER HEARD OF OR EVEN REMOTELY THOUGHT ABOUT THIS IN THE HISTORY OF EVER

MY PEOPLE HAVE SURFACED

I also associate coffee with academia - when I need to buckle down and concentrate, I have a cup of coffee. While it gives me energy and hypes me up, it’s also motivates and focuses me. (Although, this is a super personal association and I doubt other people share it with me.) So I could probably add some magic into it to direct that focus if I wanted.

Don’t forget you also have the creamer, sugar, or other things you add into your coffee to work with.

I actually made a series of three posts about exactly this while working as a barista!

MY PEOPLE, HOW HAVE I NOT FOUND YOU BEFORE NOW

I used coffee in a bag spell for work to help energize the salon and our clients.

Coffee can also be added to anti nightmare charm bags. THIS POST. And how convenient I found it while making my morning coffee ;3

fuckyeahnorsemythology
fuckyeahnorsemythology:

nimblermortal:

fuckyeahnorsemythology:

coolchicksfromhistory:

nordic-drifter:

There is no such thing as a female viking. The Old Norse term vikingar applied exclusively to men who sailed from Scandinavia for the purpose of raiding or trading. Women only ever sailed for the purpose of establishing new colonies in distant lands; for settlement.
Women in Viking Age society were in charge of the household, and in charge of making certain that food lasted through the winter. When the men were away raiding and trading, women were in charge of the farm. Although women were bound to house and family, they held a great deal of influence in society, often having full control over the distribution of food and clothing. 
There is no evidence that female warriors, valkyrie, ever existed outside of mythology. Though women were most likely trained in swordsmanship in order to defend their homes.

Some further clarification from Nordic Drifter:

Recent finds have, in fact, shown female graves containing weapons. This could suggest the possibility of female warriors. However, it is not particularly conclusive, and it is known that women were trained in swordsmanship in order to protect their homes when men were away.
There are records of women dressing as men in order to go to war. But this is distinct from the idea of a female “valkyrie” warrior, and closer to a possible transgender role - something which existed in many ancient cultures. Some noble women were known to take control of armies after their husbands’ deaths and lead them into battle.
Women and children were known to accompany the Danish army in the 9th century, and the majority of Scandinavian invaders were “marriage-minded” and may have brought their families with them. 


Also “Valkyrie” is a distinct concept from a female warrior. Valkyrie are spirits of battle that choose the slain which Odinn will take to Valhalla. What you’re thinking of is closer to a shield maiden. Shield maidens also appear only mythological lore, however they were mortal women who took up arms. Maiden kings filled a similar role in the lore or ruling a hall or landholding and defending it as a King would. The defining feature of both of these is the term “maiden” meaning unmarried. 
In the lore, at least, once a woman was married she was tied to certain social expectations, where more traditionally male roles she was excluded from except in times of emergency. 
It’s also worth noting that this is lore and historical fact. Lore likely represents a social ideal, rather than social reality.

That said, for a social ideal, the courting of Brunhild was pretty martial: throw a bigger spear farther than her (if I remember correctly), throw a bigger rock farther than her, and jump over said boulder. Sigfried manages it - but only with the help of his friend and an invisibility cloak that also makes him stronger.
This is the Nibelungen version, and it’s pretty distorted even from the Völsunga saga, but part of that distortion is the new poet’s shock and outrage at a woman defyinga man that way (at least according to the footnotes in my copy). And sure, Brunhild is unusual, but her ability to wield weapons was not what the poet was objecting to.
The other ideal woman I know about is Gudrun, who is a very nice acquiescent blushing damsel… right up until she starts a feud that culminates in her murdering her own sons and serving them up to her husband before lighting his hall on fire with him and all his men inside.

#I’m not an expert on the subject #but I am going to say that this wouldn’t be the first time archaeology has emphasized #that most history was written by white men of a certain mindset about how life works
Yes, I absolutely agree with you about archaeology! As an archaeologist myself I can say that yes, archaeology is notorious for these kind of shenanigans. Obviously we try to combat that within our own community, but unfortunately artifacts are still gendered in the lab, especially in scandinavia. (I just got back from a 6 week dig in Sweden, and was combating this filing system the entire time.)
It’s also worth mentioning that although lore may represent a social ideal, the figures of Brunhilda and Gudrun also have a lot of other purpose and commentary going on with their characters. Also, we have only the tiniest of tiny fractions of the lore preserved. 
Stories about these two characters were likely chosen and recorded by men. The stories in the eddas were definitely chosen with some kind of agenda (likely a political one) in mind. This doesn’t mean we can’t examine the stories and characters to try to glean something about icelandic society, but we should keep them in mind.

fuckyeahnorsemythology:

nimblermortal:

fuckyeahnorsemythology:

coolchicksfromhistory:

nordic-drifter:

There is no such thing as a female viking. The Old Norse term vikingar applied exclusively to men who sailed from Scandinavia for the purpose of raiding or trading. Women only ever sailed for the purpose of establishing new colonies in distant lands; for settlement.

Women in Viking Age society were in charge of the household, and in charge of making certain that food lasted through the winter. When the men were away raiding and trading, women were in charge of the farm. Although women were bound to house and family, they held a great deal of influence in society, often having full control over the distribution of food and clothing. 

There is no evidence that female warriors, valkyrie, ever existed outside of mythology. Though women were most likely trained in swordsmanship in order to defend their homes.

Some further clarification from Nordic Drifter:

Recent finds have, in fact, shown female graves containing weapons. This could suggest the possibility of female warriors. However, it is not particularly conclusive, and it is known that women were trained in swordsmanship in order to protect their homes when men were away.

There are records of women dressing as men in order to go to war. But this is distinct from the idea of a female “valkyrie” warrior, and closer to a possible transgender role - something which existed in many ancient cultures. Some noble women were known to take control of armies after their husbands’ deaths and lead them into battle.

Women and children were known to accompany the Danish army in the 9th century, and the majority of Scandinavian invaders were “marriage-minded” and may have brought their families with them. 

Also “Valkyrie” is a distinct concept from a female warrior. Valkyrie are spirits of battle that choose the slain which Odinn will take to Valhalla. What you’re thinking of is closer to a shield maiden. Shield maidens also appear only mythological lore, however they were mortal women who took up arms. Maiden kings filled a similar role in the lore or ruling a hall or landholding and defending it as a King would. The defining feature of both of these is the term “maiden” meaning unmarried. 

In the lore, at least, once a woman was married she was tied to certain social expectations, where more traditionally male roles she was excluded from except in times of emergency. 

It’s also worth noting that this is lore and historical fact. Lore likely represents a social ideal, rather than social reality.

That said, for a social ideal, the courting of Brunhild was pretty martial: throw a bigger spear farther than her (if I remember correctly), throw a bigger rock farther than her, and jump over said boulder. Sigfried manages it - but only with the help of his friend and an invisibility cloak that also makes him stronger.

This is the Nibelungen version, and it’s pretty distorted even from the Völsunga saga, but part of that distortion is the new poet’s shock and outrage at a woman defyinga man that way (at least according to the footnotes in my copy). And sure, Brunhild is unusual, but her ability to wield weapons was not what the poet was objecting to.

The other ideal woman I know about is Gudrun, who is a very nice acquiescent blushing damsel… right up until she starts a feud that culminates in her murdering her own sons and serving them up to her husband before lighting his hall on fire with him and all his men inside.

#I’m not an expert on the subject #but I am going to say that this wouldn’t be the first time archaeology has emphasized #that most history was written by white men of a certain mindset about how life works

Yes, I absolutely agree with you about archaeology! As an archaeologist myself I can say that yes, archaeology is notorious for these kind of shenanigans. Obviously we try to combat that within our own community, but unfortunately artifacts are still gendered in the lab, especially in scandinavia. (I just got back from a 6 week dig in Sweden, and was combating this filing system the entire time.)

It’s also worth mentioning that although lore may represent a social ideal, the figures of Brunhilda and Gudrun also have a lot of other purpose and commentary going on with their characters. Also, we have only the tiniest of tiny fractions of the lore preserved. 

Stories about these two characters were likely chosen and recorded by men. The stories in the eddas were definitely chosen with some kind of agenda (likely a political one) in mind. This doesn’t mean we can’t examine the stories and characters to try to glean something about icelandic society, but we should keep them in mind.